Whether you live in the UK or are visiting from afar, you won’t fail to be amazed by the unique camping spots the country has to offer. From remote lochs to steep hills, grassy fields to wooded copses, we’ve got something for everyone!

Boscastle, Cornwall
Boscastle
If it’s witches and ghouls you’re into, as well as beautiful landscapes and exploration, then camping near Boscastle in Cornwall has definitely got to be on your list. There are a number of campsites nearby such as Trebyla Farm and Lower Pennycrocker, but you could also park overnight in licensed carparks or laybys, such as the big car park in nearby Tintagel (King Arthur’s Car Park) or on the A30.

So what makes Boscastle a must? Well, not only is it a simply beautiful town, but it also has the Museum of Witchcraft and Magic, which opened in 1960 and features a range of Collections and Exhibitions, including objects of ritual magic. This is one of Cornwall’s most popular museums and holds a range of events through the year, not just for Halloween.
Boscastle has been also highlighted in the media a number of times as it is prone to flash flooding; the last time in August 2007, causing damage to properties, roads and businesses. Floods were previously reported in 2004, 1963, 1958, 1957 and 1847. Flood defences have since been strengthened to prevent against such damage again.

Walkers and hikers will delight in this part of the South West coastal path that starts at Boscastle and heads through to Minster Wood and along the Valency Valley. Keen photographers will be in their element even if they just stay in the village, with its fishing port, riverside walks and harbour.

Pendle Hill, Lancashire
Pendle Hill
If the countryside could talk, Pendle Hill would no doubt be full of tales from 1612, dating back to the hanging of witches at nearby Lancaster Castle in 1612 and then buried in the hillside. If you don’t fancy spending the night on the hill watching for ghostly happenings, then you will find campsites at nearby Burnley, Nelson and Clitheroe.
The Pendle witch trials are very famous in English history; 12 ladies were accused, with 10 tried at Lancaster Assizes, one at York assizes and one who died in prison before she could be tried. From the 11 ladies who were tried, only 1 was found not guilty.

There’s more to Pendle Hill than it’s gristly history, however. The summit is 557 metres above sea level so if you’re a keen climber, this is another reason to give it a visit. Views from the top take in the Pennines, the Bowland Fells and the West Pennine Moors, so a tick in the box for photographers, too. It was once home to wild boar and wolves, and whilst you may not find these here today, you’ll still be able to take in nature as you walk.

The Golden Fleece Pub, York
Golden Fleece
OK so it’s not a scenic spot, but the Golden Fleece Pub in York is one of York’s most famous haunted spots and well worth a visit if you’re in the area and want to catch a glimpse into the afterlife. It does offer B&B but we know our Tentboxers prefer to be out in the open, so you can also find nearby camping spots nearby, such as Nurseries Caravan Park in Askham Bryan.

The Golden Fleece dates back to the early 16th century and is a grade II listed building. It’s said to be haunted by over 10 different apparitions; the shadowy bartender, the suicidal landlord, the little girl behind the bar….really you need to visit to check it out for yourself (and perhaps get a slap up meal in the process).

Once you’ve visited the Golden Fleece, then turn your attentions to York itself. With it’s beautiful cathedral, city walls and 2 functioning bell towers, there are lots of places to go and see. Train enthusiasts will love the National Railway Museum and if you’re a history buff, York Castle should also make your to-see list.